Posts Tagged ‘romance’

Summer Sale

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From now until June 23rd, I’ve reduced the e-book prices on both The Bone Flower Throne and Fugitives of Fate down to $.99. They are both available at a wide variety of retailers, so if you click on the book covers, that will take you to a page where you can quickly access the link to your desired retailer.

Bone Flower redo 3Gods, Blood, Magic

A darkness has taken control of Culhuacan, one of the Toltec’s most powerful kingdoms. The bloodthirsty sorcerer god Smoking Mirror has sent her patron god—the benevolent Feathered Serpent–into exile, but the Feathered Serpent is determined not only to regain his sacred city, but also to end human sacrifice all together.

Princess Quetzalpetlatl barely escaped Culhuacan with her life, but when the Feathered Serpent tasks her with helping his mortal son Topiltzin fulfill his divine mandate, she eagerly embraces her destiny. Finally she can avenge her father’s murder at the hands of the Smoking Mirror’s high priest, and return home.

Yet the price for involving herself in a war among the gods is high, paid in blood and loss. But for Topiltzin—who’s more than just a brother to her—she’s willing to do anything. Even sacrifice her own heart.

Tenochtitlan, Mexico 1526—but not as history remembers it…

Driven by fiery visions of the end of the world, Aztec Emperor Cuauhtemoc averted the Spanish Conquest, and now he seeks to end the inter-tribal fighting that would have condemned the empire. When he discovers a woman from his visions working in his palace, he knows he must win her trust: only the infamous La Malinche can help him turn his enemies into allies.

Malinali has spent her whole life in slavery, passed from one abusive master to the next, and to her, Cuauhtemoc is no different than the other noblemen who’ve made her years miserable. Cuauhtemoc, however, is a determined man, and with time and work, her suspicion turns into trust, and trust grows into love.

But is love enough to truly change destiny? Especially when the shadow of unraveled history threatens to turn them into the enemies they were meant to be?

Both books make excellent summer reading getaways, so get your copy now!

Release Day! Fugitives of Fate

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Today the ebook version of my first alternate history romance, Fugitives of Fate, comes out.

Driven by fiery visions of the end of the world, Aztec Emperor Cuauhtemoc averted the Spanish Conquest, and now he seeks to end the inter-tribal fighting that would have condemned the empire. When he discovers a woman from his visions working in his palace, he knows he must win her trust: only the infamous La Malinche can help him turn his enemies into allies.

Malinali has spent her whole life in slavery, passed from one abusive master to the next, and to her, Cuauhtemoc is no different than the other noblemen who’ve made her years miserable. Cuauhtemoc, however, is a determined man, and with time and work, her suspicion turns into trust, and trust grows into love.

But is love enough to truly change destiny? Especially when the shadow of unraveled history threatens to turn them into the enemies they were meant to be?

I’ve been waiting a really long time for today to finally arrive. Quite a long time ago, when I was in the midst of writing lots of stuff for my One World alternate history series, I started what I thought was going to be a short story but it soon turned into a novella, and to my surprise, it turned out to be a genre romance. I knew nothing about writing or selling romance, for I was firmly grounded in the speculative fiction scene, and I didn’t think there was a market for it; I’d never read anything like it in any of the magazines I usually read, and it was a novella–that dreaded length that no one in spec fic publishing would touch unless the author was a big name. So I set it aside and sort of forgot about it for several years while I worked on other projects.

It was actually just after the WorldCon in Chicago that I went home and, on a whim, opened the file and gave it a read. And to my surprise, I really, really liked the basic storyline, and thought it would make an excellent novel. I knew little about romance as a genre though, so I started reading historical romances, to learn the ropes, and joined RWA, which I’d heard really excellent things about from other SF authors, and started attending the local chapter meetings. Eventually I sat down to rewrite the story from the ground up, cutting out the more in-your-face speculative elements while keeping others that were absolutely necessary to the universe (folks who have read my One World short fiction know what I’m talking about), and in 23 days, I had a novel-length manuscript finished. It was the fastest I’ve ever written a novel draft

But my usual problems surfaced: my agent didn’t want to take it on because she didn’t think there was a market for it, and though eventually, I did get some interest from a traditional publisher on it, they wanted me to change it so fundamentally, it would be like starting over from scratch.

I didn’t spend a whole lot of time shopping this around to traditional publishers; I was busy working on Bone Flower, and so this always got put to the side, and I was making the move into self-publishing and starting to feel more and more comfortable with it. In the end, I decided to move on with it on my own, so I could keep creative control and tell the story I wanted to tell rather than trying to box it into traditional genre niches. I figured that the best I could hope for was a small press, and from experience, there isn’t much they can do that I couldn’t do on my own, so why not keep the control and put the book’s fate in my own hands?

So, it’s available everywhere now, and early reviews are looking quite favorable. I even got a very nice blurb from my favorite romance author, Jeannie Lin:

“Fugitives of Fate creatively reimagines the lives of two legendary figures, bringing life and humanity to a glorious empire that we only hear about in terms of its demise. I was thoroughly fascinated and enthralled.”

Click here to find links to your favorite vendor. It’s also available in trade paperback.

Ten Books…For Your Holiday Shopping List

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Everyone’s been doing this meme about 10 books that have stuck with you, but I don’t like to play by memes. However, with the holiday season upon us, perhaps you’re looking for books to buy for your book-loving friends or loved ones, or even for yourself (because you’re going to need that escape from the realities of holiday stress), so I give you ten books I’d like to promote. I may or may not have read them, but this is the season for giving, and authors need as much exposure as they can get. So, onto the books!

Channel Zilch by Doug Sharp

From the publisher’s website: Stealing a space shuttle was the easy part.

“Hel claims that her hacker friends are a bunch of freaking geniuses. A Sidewinder up the tailpipe would be a brutal way to learn that Hel overestimates her geek pals’ expertise.”

Channel ZilchFired by NASA for stunt-flying a space shuttle during re-entry, ex-astronaut Mick Oolfson now spends his unhappy days spraying manure over soybeans from his ailing DC3, dreaming of returning to space. So when testosterone-surfing geek goddess Heloise Chin offers him an astronaut gig on Channel Zilch, a pirate orbiting reality show, Mick jumps at the chance. What Heloise doesn’t mention is that the dream gig involves stealing the space shuttle Enterprise.

Getting back into space is worth a little risk, but Mick never signed on for Russian gangsters and nightmare journeys on reeking Turkish freighters. He also didn’t expect Tobias Ishwald, the relentless head of NASA Security—and the man who got him canned—to try to ruin his dreams a second time. Trusting Hel will probably get him killed, but with a little fancy flying Mick just might see the stars again.

A near-future, hard-science thriller with heart and purpose, CHANNEL ZILCH is a smart, fast-moving adventure you won’t soon forget.

I had the privilege of reading this book in my critique group and I can tell you it is a quirky riot. Doug and I went to Clarion West together back in 2002, and what makes this book so special is that it’s proof of Doug’s indomitable spirit. You see, Doug suffers from a rare neurological disorder called Central Pain Syndrome, which can make life a living hell for those afflicted with it, but he hasn’t let this stop him from achieving his dreams of publication. He wrote at length about his struggles to write this book over at John Scalzi’s Big Idea, and you should know that a portion of every book sale goes to the Central Pain Syndrome Foundation, for research for a cure.

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The Golden City by J. Kathleen Cheney

From the publisher’s website: For two years, Oriana Paredes has been a spy among the social elite of the Golden City, reporting back to her people, the sereia, sea folk banned from the city’s shores….

Golden CityWhen her employer and only confidante decides to elope, Oriana agrees to accompany her to Paris. But before they can depart, the two women are abducted and left to drown. Trapped beneath the waves, Oriana survives because of her heritage, but she is forced to watch her only friend die.

Vowing vengeance, Oriana crosses paths with Duilio Ferreira—a police consultant who has been investigating the disappearance of a string of servants from the city’s wealthiest homes. Duilio also has a secret: He is a seer and his gifts have led him to Oriana.

Bound by their secrets, not trusting each other completely yet having no choice but to work together, Oriana and Duilio must expose a twisted plot of magic so dark that it could cause the very fabric of history to come undone….

I’ve started reading this one but like so often happens, it’s been temporarily set aside because I have writing to do (I don’t read books while I’m working on a novel). What I have read so far is fantastic, and historical fans will really appreciate the vivid attention to detail in this alternate Portugal.

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Divinity and the Python by Bonnie Randall

From the publisher’s website: “The driver’s window—perfectly intact when she and Andrew had arrived this morning—was now a shattered chrysanthemum of broken glass, and a weapon, a hammer, hung like a calling card from the frame. She grabbed her cell. Their quarry was clearly on the loose. Finger on speed dial, she reached with her free hand for the hammer.”

Divinity and the PythonThe Python is the hottest nightclub in freezing Edmonton: all skin, no substance, and definitely no spirituality. Bartender Shaynie Gavin knows better—all things have a soul, and on an evening she’s come to call Hellnight, The Python left a dark stain on hers. Now Shaynie’s moving into another place that’s more than what it seems—Divinity, the old morgue she’s refurbished into a Tarot lounge. With all her passion focused on launching the venture, Shaynie is rattled when Divinity appears to orchestrate a connection between her and superstitious hockey star Cameron Weste.

Shaynie’s reaction is nothing compared to The Python’s. Vandalism, violence, an omniscient stalker— the parallels to her lost, bloody Hellnight in the club are unmistakable. But equally undeniable is the protection emanating from her old morgue.

All things have a soul, and Divinity’s seems aligned with Shaynie’s own—but whose is twinned with the Python? As Shaynie starts hunting her stalker, it’s clear only one soul will survive.

A fast-paced, edge-of-your-seat, supernatural mystery, “Divinity and The Python” grips the reader from the first page to the shattering climax.

I haven’t had a chance to start this one yet, but man, that’s an awesome title! And the cover is beautiful, a kind of Stephen King/Harry Potter mash-up. As I understand it, it’s a kind of urban fantasy/paranormal romance story, with hockey and buildings possessed of spirits both good and evil. So if you’re a fan of either urban fantasy or paranormal romance, but are growing tired of the same old tropes, this could be the right book for you; in fact, I’m so not a fan of UF or PR because of those tropes of vampires and werewolves, and I picked this up because it didn’t have any of that.

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The Dragon and the Pearl by Jeannie Lin

From the publisher’s website: Former Emperor’s consort Ling Suyin is renowned for her beauty; the ultimate seductress. Now she lives quietly alone–until the most ruthless warlord in the region comes and steals her away….

Dragon and the PearlLi Tao lives life by the sword, and is trapped in the treacherous, lethal world of politics. The alluring Ling Suyin is at the center of the web. He must uncover her mystery without falling under her spell–yet her innocence calls out to him. How cruel if she, of all women, can entrance the man behind the legend….

Jeannie Lin writes historical romance set in Tang Dynasty China for Harlequin, and everything she writes is absolutely top-notch; there is not a single book/story she’s written that I didn’t like, but of all of them, this one is my most favorite. It defied my expectations on many levels; the hero was a character I’d absolutely loathed from a previous novel, and yet here Lin turned him into my favorite hero of all her books–so weird, huh? While reading Butterfly Swords, I found myself muttering, “OMG, someone kill him please!” but once I was through with this book, I couldn’t even fathom why I had ever thought that. Plus the heroine is not what you think she is…. The cultural immersion is really fantastic here as well. If you’re a historical romance fan and you haven’t read Jeannie Lin yet, why are you wasting your time reading this blog? Go and buy her entire backlist and binge on it like I did when I first found her last year.

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Aegean Dream by Dario Ciriello

From the publisher’s website: A true story set on Greece’s real ‘Mamma Mia’ island of Skopelos.

Aegean DreamComic and tragic by turns, Aegean Dream is a story of love, resilience, and the power of friendship. A compelling window on the daily life of a small Greek island and the spirit of its people, this book also provides striking insights into the broken institutions that would soon shake the entire global economy.

– What’s it really like to live on a tiny Greek island?
– Why is the Greek economy so messed up?
– What IS ‘The Secret’?
…and what do mysterious skulls, Russian prostitutes, President Bush the elder, and Pierce Brosnan have to do with it all?

Dario Ciriello’s ‘Aegean Dream’. All story. All true.

Dario and I went to Clarion West together too, and we’ve kept in touch since then, first with our critique group Written in Blood (which he started) and most recently with his publishing venture Panverse Publishing. A few years back, he decided to pursue his dream of living on a Greek island, so he and his wife moved to Skopelos; Aegean Dream is the story of that journey, and it’s compelling as all-hell; you will laugh, you will cry, you’ll wish you were there, you’ll feel glad you aren’t. I read it for critique while on a camping trip in mosquito hell in the mountains, on a stack of paper printed out in trade paperback format, and I pretty much forgot I was in Colorado instead of the Mediterranean for the duration of that trip. A good one for non-fiction fans who like good human drama.

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Obsidian and Blood by Aliette de Bodard

From the publisher’s website: A massive fantasy omnibus containing all three novels in the Obsidian and Blood series:

SERVANT OF THE UNDERWORLD
Year One-Knife, Tenochtitlan – the capital of the Aztecs. The end of the world is kept at bay only by the magic of human sacrifice. A priestess disappears from an empty room drenched in blood. Acatl, high priest, must find her, or break the boundaries between the worlds of the living and the dead.

Obsidian and BloodHARBINGER OF THE STORM
The year is Two House and the Mexica Empire teeters on the brink of destruction, lying vulnerable to the flesh-eating star-demons – and to the return of their creator, a malevolent goddess only held in check by the Protector God’s power. The council is convening to choose a new emperor, but when a councilman is found dead, only Acatl, High Priest of the Dead, can solve the mystery.

MASTER OF THE HOUSE OF DARTS
The year is Three Rabbit, and the storm is coming…

The coronation war for the new Emperor has just ended in a failure, the armies retreating with a mere forty prisoners of war – not near enough sacrifices to ensure the favor of the gods. When one of those prisoners of war dies of a magical illness, ACATL, High Priest for the Dead, is summoned to investigate.

Yes, this is actually three novels in one, and they are near and dear to my heart, for obvious reasons. Aliette is a dear friend and a member of my critique group Written In Blood, so I got to see all three of these books at the pre-publication stage. We often complain that fantasy is very white and western in flavor, but Aliette’s Obsidian and Blood series takes you outside that pseudo-European zone and plunks you down in the middle of something you’ve probably not read before. For those who’ve read The Bone Flower Throne but not any of Aliette’s novels, our books might share a similar cultural setting, but they are very different types of stories. If you like mysteries in unfamiliar settings, you would probably like these books; if you like fantasy following the lives of non-European characters, you’d probably like these books; if you like to mix the two, jackpot.

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Strangers in the Land by Stant Litore

From the publisher’s website: Stant Litore’s The Zombie Bible retells biblical tales and ancient history as episodes in humanity’s long struggle with hunger … and with the hungry dead.

Strangers in the LandFour must stand against the dead. The aging prophetess Devora. Hurriya, the slave girl. Zadok, a legend among warriors. And the widower Barak, who has sworn to defend his homeland from a migration of walking corpses greater than has ever been seen.

Devora is all too familiar with the unclean dead. She was there when her mother was pulled screaming from her tent by zombies. And when her mother rose, famished for flesh, it was Devora’s hand that ended her hunger. Now Devora has struck an uneasy alliance with those she fears most among the living. Yet the strangers in the land must stand together if they are to rid the land of its curse.

I’m no usually a fan of zombies–never even had any desire at all to watch The Walking Dead or the plethora of other zombie movies or shows out there–but this one drew my curiosity because it’s not post-apocalyptic, but rather historical. And anyone who knows me knows that history is my thing. Stant and I were on a panel together at MileHiCon this last October, on Non-Western Fantasy, and when I heard he was writing Bible stories with zombies, I knew I had to give it a try and see what the angle is (and it turns out it’s really quite interesting). I’m not finished with this book yet, but so far it rocks. He has a newer one out, that 47 North is releasing as a weekly e-serial through Amazon, and for US readers it’s only $1.99.

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The Soul Mirror by Carol Berg

From the author’s website: Anne de Vernase rejoices that she has no talent for magic. Her father’s pursuit of depraved sorcery has left her family in ruins, and he remains at large, convicted of treason and murder by Anne’s own testimony. Now, the tutors at Collegia Seravain inform her that her gifted younger sister has died in a magical accident. It seems but life’s final mockery that cool, distant Portier de Savin-Duplais, the librarian turned royal prosecutor, arrives with the news that the king intends to barter her hand in marriage.

Soul MirrorAnne recognizes that the summoning carries implications far beyond a bleak personal future – and they are all about magic. Merona, the royal city, is beset by plagues of rats and birds, and mysterious sinkholes that swallow light and collapse buildings. Whispers of hauntings and illicit necromancy swirl about the queen’s volatile sorcerer. And a murder in the queen’s inner circle convinces Anne that her sister’s death was no accident. With no one to trust but a friend she cannot see, Anne takes up her sister’s magical puzzle, plunging into the midst of a centuries-old rivalry and coming face-to-face with the most dangerous sorcerer in Sabria. His name is Dante.

This is actually the second book in the Collegia Magica series, but it’s my favorite of the three. I do think it stands well enough on its own that it’s not entirely necessary to start with the first book The Spirit Lens, but a reader will get so much more out of this book if they do. Carol has been writing a wide variety of fantasy for Roc for a number of years now and everything of hers that I’ve read is very good, so you couldn’t go wrong picking anything from her backlist. She also has a new series coming out in August of next year.

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Oz Reimagined, edited by John Joseph Adams and Douglas Cohen

From the publisher’s website: FOREWORD BY GREGORY MAGUIRE, NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF WICKED.

When L. Frank Baum introduced Dorothy and friends to the American public in 1900, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz became an instant, bestselling hit. Today the whimsical tale remains a cultural phenomenon that continues to spawn wildly popular books, movies, and musicals. Now, editors John Joseph Adams and Douglas Cohen have brought together leading fantasy writers such as Orson Scott Card and Seanan McGuire to create the ultimate anthology for Oz fans – and, really, any reader with an appetite for richly imagined worlds. Stories include:

  • Oz ReimaginedFrank Baum’s son has the real experiences that his father later fictionalized in Orson Scott Card’s “Off to See the Emperor.”
  • Seanan McGuire’s “Emeralds to Emeralds, Dust to Dust” finds Dorothy grown up, bitter, and still living in Oz. And she has a murder to solve – assuming Ozma will stop interfering with her life long enough to let her do her job.
  • In “Blown Away,” Jane Yolen asks: What if Toto was dead and stuffed, Ozma was a circus freak, and everything you thought you knew as Oz was really right here in Kansas?
  • “The Cobbler of Oz” by Jonathan Maberry explores a Winged Monkey with wings too small to let her fly. Her only chance to change that rests with the Silver Slippers.
  • In Tad Williams’s futuristic “The Boy Detective of Oz,” Orlando investigates the corrupt Oz simulation of the Otherland network.

And more…

Some stories are dystopian…Some are dreamlike…All are undeniably Oz.

Includes stories by these authors: Dale Bailey, Orson Scott Card, Rae Carson, David Farland, C.C. Finlay, Jeffrey Ford, Theodora Goss, Simon R. Green, Kat Howard, Ken Liu, Seanan McGuire, Jonathan Maberry, Rachel Swirsky, Robin Wasserman, Tad Williams, Jane Yolen

I’ve fallen out of the habit of reading short fiction in the last couple of years, so I haven’t read this, but many of these stories sound pretty interesting, and there’s some quality names attached to them. I just might have to give it a try myself. Doug Cohen is a good friend who used to be an editor with Realms of Fantasy and he’s since turned his attention to his own writing, but I’m glad to see him still keeping a foot in the editing hot-tub, and especially pleased to see him pairing up with the already fantastic anthologist John Joseph Adams. This one is sure to be a winner.

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One Night with the Laird by Nicola Cornick

From the publisher’s website: Can true love be born from scandal?

One Night with the LairdShe is young and beautiful and fashionable, Edinburgh’s most flirtatious hostess. But within the merry widow beats a grieving heart. Lady Mairi mourns the husband she lost two years before—and no matter how accomplished a lover Jack Rutherford may be, their wanton night together was an encounter of the body only, and Lady Mairi would prefer to forget it.

But when Mairi is threatened by a blackmailer, Jack is the only man who can protect her. As they work together to uncover where the danger lies, their passion reignites. Little by little, the masks they wear burn away, and their most private secrets come to light….

This post is actually the first time I’ve heard of this book, so you’re probably asking why it’s here. Well, I decided to reserve one slot on this list for a book by one of my twitter followers, picked at random; I closed my eyes and scrolled through the follower list, and after several times of landing on folks who either weren’t writers, or were writers but had no books published, I landed on Nicola, who–to my joy–writes historical romance for Harlequin. Historical romance is the only genre of romance I read, and I haven’t heard of Nicola before, so I’m going to give her a try; and, in my experience, 9 times out of 10, Harlequin puts out good, entertaining reads.

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Harlequin’s So You Think You Can Write Contest

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I’m still pretty new to the whole romance genre, but there are tons of contests new writers can enter, and now that I have an actual completed manuscript, I’ve decided to dip my toe into the contest scene. Last month, I entered the MoRWA Gateway to the Best contest, and just last week I learned of a rather cool, free contest run by Harlequin called So You Think You Can Write? For a period of about 3 weeks, Harlequin lets authors (who aren’t already contracted with Harlequin) post the first chapter of their novel and a 100-word synopsis for readers to look at and comment on. All entries are also looked at and graded by Harlequin editors of 20 different lines, then, authors of those samples with the 50 highest ratings are invited to submit their complete manuscript to the editors. The editors then narrow it to down to the top ten and those full manuscripts are posted on Harlequin’s website for reader voting. The one voted best manuscript wins a contract, though in the past quite a few folks in the top ten have landed contracts as well. While there was a time when the thought of a having a full manuscript available to read out on the internet would have made me squicky, I’m just not there anymore; there’s only a handful of places that I think would be remotely interested in a novel set outside the Regency, Highlander, and medieval settings, so self-publishing seems the most likely route for this book anyway, so why not at least give it a try. Besides, let’s not be overeager and think that I would even get beyond the top 50, even if I made it that far to begin with. What I’m really hoping for is some feedback, and maybe even meet some folks who would be interested in exchanging critiques (I’ve gotten one offer to beta read, so I’m super excited about that).

Anyway, the first chapter of my alternate history romance set in the universe of my One World series is on the contest website. Here’s the pitch for it:

Driven by visions of the end of the world, Aztec Emperor Cuauhtemoc averted the Spanish Conquest of Central America. When he discovers the slave woman who would have helped Cortes working in his palace, he’s determined to win her trust, so she can help him turn his enemies into allies.

But to Malinali, he’s no different than the other noblemen who’ve made her life as a slave miserable. With time and work, suspicion turns into trust, and trust grows into love, but the shadows of an avoided past threatens to turn them into the enemies history meant them to be.

You can read the first chapter here.

If you have a manuscript you’re interested in entering yourself, they’re accepting entries until 4pm EDT on October 9th. You can follow discussion about the contest on twitter at #sytycw2013.

And now for a little down-time

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I find myself unexpectedly without a book to work on today, so it’s going to be a day of playing some Grand Theft Auto, right? Right? Yeah, probably not. While edits for BFT haven’t reached me yet, my editor did send me a honey-do-list of things he’d like from me, namely a map of some kind (which I do have! Hooray!), a Dramatis Personae (which I might have somewhere in my files, to help me make sure I was spelling names right), and a royal family tree (which I don’t have). There’s also back cover work to be done, which I think I’m actually going to start that over from scratch because the one from my query is just blah. So there’s plenty to work on there.

On the other project, I’ve officially kicked off the agent hunt, but am taking it slowly and meticulously this time. The previous time I was flat-out set on getting an agent; this time, I’m feeling like it’s less imperative. I like the idea of having someone on my team who can not only poke an editor for an update but actually get a timely response to such things, not to mention that keen eye for contract slipperiness, but the romance genre does appear to be more open to unagented authors than SF/F, so I could go it alone if need be. So this time, I’m picking and choosing my queries carefully. There is a lot of research to be done, websites and blogs to read, Twitter feeds and interviews to peruse to help me solidify my small list of agents to approach.

In the end, I’m likely to do a little bit of all it. But mostly I’m going to be doing laundry. Lots and lots of laundry.